Immigration lawyer says Daca was ‘inaccurate’

Immigration attorney Andrew Sainsbury said the Daca decision was a ‘betrayal’ of the American people.

“We were hoping that the DACA program was going to allow us to come to Australia legally and legally get a job,” Mr Sainsburysaid.

The attorney said Daca had caused “a lot of anxiety” for families and businesses, adding the government’s response to the DACA decision had been “horrific”.

“This is a betrayal of the trust of the Australian people, and certainly a betrayal to the Australian Labor Party,” Mr Stensbury said.

“It’s a real shame that the government is not taking any steps to ensure that the millions of Australians who were waiting in line for their Daca card, or for their employment rights, have access to the legal process that’s been provided to them.”

He said the government was also ignoring the recommendations of the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC), which recommended Daca be expanded to include non-citizens, but was not included in the DCA decision.

“What’s happening is that the Department of Immigration and Citizenship (DIC) are not taking the MAC recommendations seriously and instead they are using them as a political football, and this is really disappointing,” Mr O’Sullivan said.

Mr O’SULLIVAN said the immigration minister was not being honest about the consequences of the Dacaca decision.

He questioned whether the decision would affect future applications for work visas, saying the government should have given a more detailed analysis.

“If this decision is a mistake then it has had an impact on our ability to have a proper discussion about the impact of this decision,” Mr Osullivan said.

If you look at the evidence of what has happened, the MAC’s recommendations were clearly wrong.””

[The MAC] said that Daca should not be expanded.

If you look at the evidence of what has happened, the MAC’s recommendations were clearly wrong.”

Mr O’,Sullivan said he hoped the government would not make the same mistake again.

ABC Immigration reporter, John Daley, contributed to this report.

Topics:immigration,law-crime-and-justice,immigration,australia